TUGS Student Research Exhibit Shows the Creative Side of Academic Research

Article and photos by Erin Kang

Emily Krause, VP of TUGS for 2012, and Marc Acton Filion, President of TUGS for 2013

Emily Krause, VP of TUGS for 2012, and Marc Acton Filion, President of TUGS for 2013

University students often need some guidance in understanding how their studies may extend to life outside of school. The Toronto Undergraduate Geography Society (TUGS) recognizes this struggle and strives to provide events that help bridge the gap between what we learn in school and what we do afterwards. On March 20th and March 21st, students of Geography and Planning at the U of T St. George campus gathered in the Geography Lounge to examine the variety of works produced by their peers. Submissions ranged from GIS projects documenting the effects of the Tar Sands over time, to Vision Plans for Toronto’s transportation system, to cartography projects displaying the spatial effects of happiness and crime in cities.

“It’s these kind of events that give students the opportunity to learn about the different career paths you can follow with background in Geography and Planning. I like the social element that TUGS brings to academic events like field course seminars and workshops. And you guys always have candy!” one student energetically remarked.

“The visual element of this exhibit was key in organizing this exhibit,” said a TUGS representative. “We wanted to move away from the traditional idea that undergraduate life at U of T is defined by academic papers and research reports. Showcasing the ability to express creativity within academic life is important to students.”

Demosthenis (Demos) Antonopoulos.

Demosthenis (Demos) Antonopoulos.

Grad students, undergrad students, professors, and lecturers were welcome to this Exhibit, now in its 2nd year and due to continue in

the 2013/2014 academic year. The Toronto Undergraduate Geography Students Society’s Exhibit continues to represent the University of Toronto’s geography student body, providing a valuable element to student life.