Timetables, Courses, & Syllabi

2020 Fall Undergraduate Timetable

**SUBJECT TO CHANGE** Please refer to the FAS timetable for Tutorial information, official time and location, and additional needed information.

– Please Click here for the FAS Timetable

Click here for the Summer 2020 Timetable
For previous undergraduate timetables, please see the archive link on the right-hand column.

Important Dates:
  • F section courses run from September 10th to December 9th
  • Last day to add or change F meeting section: September 23rd
  • Last day to cancel F section code courses without academic penalty: November 9th
  • Y section courses run from September 10th to April 1st
  • Last day to add or change Y meeting section: September 23rd
  • Last day to cancel Y section code courses without academic penalty: February 15th
Examination Periods:
    • December 11th – 22nd: Final examinations in courses with an F section code (term tests in Y section code courses)
    • April 7th – 30th: Final examinations in courses with a Y section code
Timetable:

Last updated June 26th, 2020.

– Please click on course code to see description – 
COURSE TITLEINSTRUCTOR DAY/TIMEDELIVERY
GGR101H1FHistories of Environmental ChangeOnline
GGR107H1FEnvironment, Food, and PeopleMonday 12pm - 2pmOnline
GGR124H1FCities and Urban LifeOnline
GGR197H1FNature, Conservation and JusticeThursday 3pm - 5pmOnline
GGR198H1FPolitical SpacesR. SilveyTuesday 1pm - 3pmDual Delivery
GGR205H1FIntroduction to Soil ScienceMonday 2pm - 4pmDual Delivery
GGR206H1FIntroduction to HydrologyTuesday 12pm - 2pm
Dual Delivery
GGR217H1FUrban Landscapes and PlanningMonday 1pm - 3pmDual Delivery
GGR221H1FNew Economic SpacesTuesday 10am - 12pmDual Delivery
GGR254H1FGeography USAOnline
GGR270H1FIntroductory Analytical MethodsWednesday 2pm - 4pmOnline
GGR272H1FGeographic Information and Mapping ITuesday 10am - 12pmDual Delivery
GGR301H1FFluvial GeomorphologyThursday 1pm - 3pmDual Delivery
GGR308H1FCanadian Arctic and Subarctic Environments Tuesday 10am - 12pmDual Delivery
JGE321H1FCultural Perspectives on Environmental Management Thursday 11am - 1pmOnline
GGR326H1FRemaking the Global EconomyWednesday 4pm - 6pmDual Delivery
JGE331H1FResource and Environmental TheoryWednesday 2pm - 4pmDual Delivery
GGR334H1FWater Resource ManagementWednesday 12pm - 2pmOnline
GGR336H1FUrban Historical Geography of North AmericaThursday 1pm - 3pmDual Delivery
GGR337H1FEnvironmental Remote SensingMonday 10am - 12pmDual Delivery
GGR341H1FChanging Geography of Latin America Tuesday 12pm - 2pm Online
GGR342H1FThe Changing Geography of Southeast AsiaThursday 3pm - 5pmDual Delivery
GGR344H1FPolitical Economy of Germany and the EU Monday 2pm - 4pmDual Delivery
JGI346H1FThe Urban Planning ProcessWednesday 10am -1pmDual Delivery
GGR347H1FEfficient Use of EnergyMonday 5pm - 8pmOnline
GGR373H1FAdvanced Geographic Information SystemsTuesday 1pm - 3pmDual Delivery
GGR390H1FField MethodsTuesday 3pm - 6pmClass
GGR414H1FAdvanced Remote SensingJ. LiuThursday 10am - 12pmDual Delivery
GGR416H1FEnvironmental Impact AssessmentMonday 5pm - 8pmOnline
GGR419H1FEnvironmental JusticeWednesday 4pm - 6pmOnline
GGR421H1FHistories of Geographical Thought Thursday 10am - 12pm. Online
JIG440H1FIndigenous GeographiesWednesday 2pm - 5pmDual Delivery
GGR458H1FSelected Topics in Urban GeographyWednesday 2pm - 4pmOnline
GGR491H1FResearch ProjectDual Delivery
GGR492H1FSenior PracticumDual Delivery
GGR492Y1YSenior PracticumDual Delivery
GGR493Y1Geography Professional ExperienceDual Delivery
GGR496H1FIndependent ResearchDual Delivery
GGR497H1FIndependent ResearchDual Delivery
GGR498H1FIndependent ResearchDual Delivery
GGR499H1FIndependent Research Dual Delivery

 

GGR107H1F: Environment Food and People
Examines the relations between food, nature, and society. Food is fundamental to human existence, and central to most cultures; it also has significant and widespread effects on the physical and social environments. Food is used as a lens to explore human-environment interactions locally and globally. Serves as an introduction to environmental and human geography.

GGR112H1F: Geographies of Globalization, Development and Inequality
Economic development and underdevelopment are taking shape in an increasingly interconnected global context. This course examines geographic approaches to “Third World” development, economic globalization, poverty, and inequality. It pays particular attention to the roles of rural-urban and international migration in shaping specific landscapes of development.

GGR124H1F: Cities and Urban Life
Offers an introduction to North American cities and urbanization in a global context. It explores social, cultural, political and economic forces, processes, and events that shape contemporary urbanism. The course adopts the lens of ‘fixity’ and ‘flow’ to examine how the movement of people, ideas, goods, and capital, as well as their containment in the infrastructure and space of the city, give rise to particular urban forms.

GGR197H1F: Nature, Conservation and Justice
Every day we read about climate change, species extinction, environmental degradation and the need for nature conservation. It is increasingly becoming apparent that the environmental problems that we face today arise from a deeper crisis relating to human ways of viewing and connecting to nature. This course asks how we can rework human ways of relating to nature, while querying the idea of “nature” and questioning the dominant approaches to nature conservation. It asks how can concerns for nature and for other species be balanced with that for human livelihoods and well-being? How can inequalities with regards to the distribution of environmental goods and bads be reduced? How are citizens and communities in the different parts of the world struggling against environmental injustice and to protect their local environments? How do these place-based movement demand justice and what visions do they articulate for a more just and sustainable world? How do indigenous worldviews offer conceptual resources for rethinking nature and our ways of relating to nature? The course will explore these questions using lectures, class discussion, videos and student presentations. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

GGR198H1F: Political Spaces
Is space political? In what ways? What are the implications of thinking about politics geographically? How do political conflicts both invoke and transform space and place? What kinds of alternative political relationships to space and alternative mappings can we imagine? This course will attempt to answer those questions while exploring a wide range of possible contexts in which political spaces are evident. These may include: conflicts over the intimate spaces of the body, identity, and the home; the racialization and gendering of space; the politics of cities and urbanization; the boundaries of public and private space; struggles over land, property, resources and ‘nature’; the political geographies of labour, citizenship and migration; globalization of economic markets and alternative economic political and social cartographies; borders, geopolitics, and the territorial politics of empire; and the geographic projects of colonialism, post-coloniality, modernity, and modernization. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

GGR205H1F: Introduction to Soil Science
Introduction to soil science dealing with the chemical, physical, and biological properties of soils; soil formation and development; the classification of soils, and the application of soil science to environmental, agricultural and forestry issues. Field trip cost: $20.

GGR206H1F: Introduction to Hydrology
Introduction to the hydrologic cycle with emphasis on the physical processes, including precipitation, interception, evaporation, runoff, ground water and soil water. Basic hydrological models will be practiced. Field trip cost: $20.

GGR217H1F: Urban Landscapes and Planning
Considers the role of planning in shaping the urban landscape through historical and contemporary examples that illustrate the interplay of modernist and post-modernist approaches to city building. Traces the origins, competing rationalities and lingering effects of planning in the production of urban space. Broaches possibilities for engaging planning critically to address challenges of social and environmental justice in cities today.

GGR221H1F: New Economic Spaces
Provides an introduction to economic geography and economic geography theory from the 1970s on, illustrating the different ways that geographers have conceptualized the restructuring of resource industries, manufacturing and services. The crisis of Fordism and the rise of new production models will be given particular attention, along with the reorganization of finance, the rise of cultural industries and the globalization of commodity chains. New regimes of governance of the economy will also be considered.

GGR254H1F: Geography USA
After a short historical overview of the making of America, this course focuses on contemporary issues in American society, economy, politics, race, regional distinctions and disparities, urban development. GGR254 Syllabus Fall 2019

GGR270H1F: Introductory Analytical Methods
Theory and practical application of elementary quantitative techniques in geography emphasizing descriptive, inferential and spatial statistical analysis, probability, and sampling.

GGR272H1F: Geographic Information and Mapping I
Introduction to digital mapping and spatial analysis using geographic information systems (GIS). Students learn how to use GIS software to find, edit, analyze and map geographic data to create their own maps, analyze geographic problems and use techniques that can be applied to a variety of subject areas.

GGR301H1F: Fluvial Geomorphology
Elements of drainage basin morphology and hydrology, classification of rivers, stream patterns and hydraulic geometry. Elements of open channel flow, sediment transport and the paleohydrology of river systems. River channel adjustments to environmental change, human impact and the management/design of river habitats. Exercises include experimentation in a laboratory flume. Usually offered every other year. Field trip cost: $20.

GGR308H1F: Canadian Arctic and Subarctic Environments
We will explore the climate geomorphology, soils, hydrology, biogeochemical cycling, limnology and food web structures of the Arctic and Subarctic. Current stresses of climate change and pollution are discussed along with scientific and political solutions.

GGR326H1F: Remaking the Global Economy
Examines links between global economic integration and geographically uneven economic development. Focuses on debates and empirical studies on global production networks (GPNs), and associated issues such as offshoring, outsourcing, and upgrading. Blends analysis of both theory and practice of business firms and regional development. Seeks to develop an in-depth understanding of the key actors driving contemporary global economic transformation, within the ‘transnational space’ constituted and structured by transnational firns, state institutions, and ideologies.

JGE331H1F: Resource and Environmental Theory
Introduction to and critical evaluation of major ideas and conceptual traditions underpinning environmental and natural resource politics and regulation. Topics include: parks and protected areas, market-based environmental regulation, property rights and conservation, Malthusianism, and biodiversity conservation. Emphasis is placed on critical reading of primary texts.

GGR334H1F: Water Resource Management
Managing demand and supply; linkages between water quality and human health. Case studies from the industrial world and from developing countries, rural and urban. Implications of population growth and climate change for water resource management.

GGR336H1F: Urban Historical Geography of North America
This course explores the emergence and reproduction of class and racial social spaces, the development of new economic spaces, and the growing importance of the reform and planning movements. Emphasis is on metropolitan development between 1850 and 1950.

GGR337H1F: Environmental Remote Sensing
Principles of optical, active and passive microwave remote sensing; satellite orbit and sensor characteristics; image processing and analysis techniques and software; and environmental remote sensing applications.

GGR341H1F: Geography of Latin America
Seeks to develop a general understanding of present-day Latin America by focusing on human-environment interactions, past and present. Case studies are used to understand the diversity of Latin American landscapes (physical and cultural), and how they are changing within the context of globalization.

GGR3421H1F: Geography of Southeast Asia
Examines changes in the social, political and economic geography of Southeast Asian countries. Examples drawn from Thailand, Singapore, Indonesia, Vietnam and the Philippines as these emerging newly industrialized countries enter the 21st century. Emphasis on political-economy, urbanization and environment since 1950.

JGI346H1F: The Urban Planning Process
Overview of how planning tools and practice shape the built form of cities. This course introduces twentieth century physical planning within its historical, social, legal, and political contexts. Community and urban design issues are addressed at local and regional scales and in both central cities and suburbs. The focus is on Toronto and the Canadian experience, with comparative examples from other countries, primarily the United States. Transportation costs: $20.

GGR373H1F: Advanced Geographic Information Systems
Advanced theory, techniques, and applications in geographic information systems (GIS), including interpolation, geostatistics, modeling, and raster and vector analysis. GIS project design and implementation.

GGR390H1F: Field Methods
Introduction to field methods in geomorphology, vegetation mapping/analysis, soils, hydrology, and climatology. The course includes exercises and a group project during a one-week field camp, a little preparation during the preceding summer, and complementary practical work and/or seminars during the Fall Term. Each student is required to pay the costs of their transportation and accommodation (field trip costs: $300). This course meets the field requirement for Physical & Environmental Geography programs. The field camp normally runs for one week at the end of August. Students must register with the Department by April. Consult with the department in case of conflict or concerns. Course may be limited by size. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

GGR414H1F: Advanced Remote Sensing
Building on GGR337H1 Environmental Remote Sensing with advanced theories and techniques for land cover mapping, vegetation biophysical and biochemical parameter retrievals, optical and thermal remote sensing of urban environment, and application of satellite remote sensing to terrestrial water and carbon cycle estimation. Basic radiative transfer theories as applied to vegetation will be given in some detail as the basis for various remote sensing applications. Optical instruments for measuring vegetation structural parameters will be demonstrated in the field.

GGR416H1F: Environmental Impact Assessment
Environmental impact assessment (EIA) as a mechanism for avoiding or mediating the potential costs of development. The course focuses on the theory and practice of EIA in Canada in general and Ontario in particular. Using a broad definition of environment, various components of EIA are addressed, with an emphasis on principles, legal and institutional frameworks, stages in the process, and specific analytical techniques.

GGR419H1F: Environmental Justice
Examines how environmental problems affect people, communities and societies differentially and how marginalized communities and people often bear the brunt of environmental costs, while contributing little to their creation. It uses readings and case studies from across the globe to address the production of environmental injustice and the struggle for environmental justice.

GGR458H1F: Selected Topics in Urban Geography
This course focuses on a special topic in urban geography and covers it with more depth than would otherwise be the case in a survey-oriented class. The aim is to utilize this single topic as a vehicle to understanding how urban geographical ideas are produced more widely. Check the department website for the theme (updated each year).

GGR491Y1Y: Research Project
Specially designed for students wishing to gain experience in conducting research in their area of specialization. Of particular value for geographers interested in graduate study, or positions in government, planning and consulting firms where research skills may be an asset. Students select a research problem and complete a project under the supervision of a faculty member. Enrolment requires written permission from a faculty supervisor and Associate Chair, Undergraduate; early discussion with a likely supervisor is encouraged. Enrolment may be completed at any time up to September; open to students in a Specialist or Major Program sponsored by the Department of Geography. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

GGR492H1F: Senior Practicum
Students design and implement an independent applied geography/planning project in consultation with an employer (paid or volunteer), who will act as their “client.” Enrolment requires written permission from a staff supervisor and Associate Chair, Undergraduate. Only open to students who are enrolled in a Specialist or Major program sponsored by the Department of Geography. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

GGR492H1Y: Senior Practicum
Students design and implement an independent applied geography/planning project in consultation with an employer (paid or volunteer), who will act as their “client.” Enrolment requires written permission from a staff supervisor and Associate Chair, Undergraduate. Only open to students who are enrolled in a Specialist or Major program sponsored by the Department of Geography. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

GGR492Y1Y: Senior Practicum
Students design and implement an independent applied geography/planning/GIS project in consultation with an employer (paid or volunteer), who will act as their “client”. Enrolment required written permission from a staff supervisor and Associate Chair, Undergraduate. Only open to students who have completed 10 FCEs and who are enrolled in a Specialist, Major or GIS minor program sponsored by the Department of Geography. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

GGR493Y1Y: Geography Professional Experience
Undertake professional placement matching academic interests and career goals. Students meet regularly during the year in class to cover topics such as: reflective writing, project management, career planning, and the application of academic skills in professional contexts. Research project required that connects a topic related to placement with academic literatures. Normally, one day per week spent at placement site. For students in their final year of a Geography major or specialist program of study, or the GIS Minor. Satisfies program requirements based on internship. Space limited. Applications are reviewed in early spring. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

GGR496H1F: Independent Research
Independent research extension to one of the courses already completed in Geographic Information Systems. Enrolment requires written permission from a faculty supervisor and Associate Chair, Undergraduate. Only open to students who have completed 10 FCEs and who are enrolled in the GIS program sponsored by the Department of Geography. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

GGR497H1F: Independent Research
Independent research extension to one of the courses already completed in Environmental Geography. Enrolment requires written permission from a faculty supervisor and Associate Chair, Undergraduate. Only open to students who have completed 10 FCE’s and who are enrolled in a Specialist or Major program sponsored by the Department of Geography. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

GGR498H1F: Independent Research
Independent research extension to one of the courses already completed in Physical Geography. Enrolment requires written permission from a faculty supervisor and Associate Chair, Undergraduate. Only open to students who have completed 10 FCEs and who are enrolled in a Specialist or Major program sponsored by the Department of Geography. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

GGR499H1F: Independent Research
Independent research extension to one of the courses already completed in a social science or humanities branch of Geography. Enrolment requires written permission from a faculty supervisor and Associate Chair, Undergraduate. Only open to students who have completed 10 FCEs and who are enrolled in a Specialist or Major program sponsored by the Department of Geography. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.