Emily Gilbert in the U of T News on President Donald Trump’s first week in office

U of T News spoke with Emily Gilbert, an associate professor of geography and planning and Canadian studies in the Faculty of Arts & Science, about the implications of these executive orders and how Canada will be affected by these sweeping changes.

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Alan Walks in the Toronto Star speaking to gentrification “Hidden Pockets of Gentrification…”

The hidden pockets in Toronto where gentrification is really happening

Michael Widener profiled in the UofT News – Mapping the city: Busting conventional wisdom on food deserts

Mapping the City is an ongoing series on the stories we can tell about people and places in Toronto through maps created by University of Toronto students and faculty.
In the fourth instalment, U of T News writer Romi Levine profiles the work of Michael Widener.

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Congratulations Andre Sorensen, UTSC Human Geography – Winner of the 2016 Association of European Schools of Planning Best Published Paper Award

This prestigious award is the best paper selected from nominations submitted by the Editorial Boards of 52 European planning journals http://www.aesop-planning.eu/en_GB/best-published-paper.
Congratulations to Andre, for his paper: “Taking path dependence seriously: an historical institutionalist research agenda in planning history”, Planning Perspectives 30(1): 17-38.

Steven Farber in the U of T News – Mapping the city: How transit can fix access to jobs in Toronto

Toronto is a sprawling city – one that keeps growing in all directions to accommodate the growing number of people who come to live here. But its vastness has made it hard to connect every part of the city with public transportation. That, in turn, has created inequalities in opportunity, especially between high and low income households.

Steven Farber, assistant professor of Geography and Planning at University of Toronto, set out to find the link between transportation and opportunity by creating a series of maps with the help of U of T students Jeff Allen and Maria Grandez.

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Congratulations to Jesse Ajayi, MCIP, RPP, and MScPl (2011). Jesse received Honorable Mention from the Canadian Institute of Planners for its President’s Award for Young Planners.

 

Jesse specializes in crafting plain-language municipal plans. He has managed planning departments in Nunavut and Northern Alberta, overseeing several statutory plan reviews and providing professional planning advice to dozens of communities. Jesse holds a Master of Planning from the University of Toronto and is currently the Director of Planning and Development for Athabasca County.

TUGS Student Research Exhibit Shows the Creative Side of Academic Research

Article and photos by Erin Kang

Emily Krause, VP of TUGS for 2012, and Marc Acton Filion, President of TUGS for 2013

Emily Krause, VP of TUGS for 2012, and Marc Acton Filion, President of TUGS for 2013

University students often need some guidance in understanding how their studies may extend to life outside of school. The Toronto Undergraduate Geography Society (TUGS) recognizes this struggle and strives to provide events that help bridge the gap between what we learn in school and what we do afterwards. On March 20th and March 21st, students of Geography and Planning at the U of T St. George campus gathered in the Geography Lounge to examine the variety of works produced by their peers. Submissions ranged from GIS projects documenting the effects of the Tar Sands over time, to Vision Plans for Toronto’s transportation system, to cartography projects displaying the spatial effects of happiness and crime in cities.

“It’s these kind of events that give students the opportunity to learn about the different career paths you can follow with background in Geography and Planning. I like the social element that TUGS brings to academic events like field course seminars and workshops. And you guys always have candy!” one student energetically remarked.

“The visual element of this exhibit was key in organizing this exhibit,” said a TUGS representative. “We wanted to move away from the traditional idea that undergraduate life at U of T is defined by academic papers and research reports. Showcasing the ability to express creativity within academic life is important to students.”

Demosthenis (Demos) Antonopoulos.

Demosthenis (Demos) Antonopoulos.

Grad students, undergrad students, professors, and lecturers were welcome to this Exhibit, now in its 2nd year and due to continue in

the 2013/2014 academic year. The Toronto Undergraduate Geography Students Society’s Exhibit continues to represent the University of Toronto’s geography student body, providing a valuable element to student life.

TUGS Research Showcase

Event Review by Erin Kang
Photos by Lip Liew

Nikki Ng and Joe Leydon

Nikki Ng and Joe Leydon

Students munched on mini-sliders and gummy worms as they perused the work of fellow Geography undergraduate students on Thursday, March 8. Held in the Geography Lounge on the 5th floor of Sid Smith, the event gave undergraduate and graduate students, faculty and staff an oppurtunity to review some of the best undergraduate research projects from 2011-12. Ranging from GIS mapping projects, large poster displays, cartography projects, an interactive video presentation and even a laser-cut model of the Toronto waterfront, students were able to see the breadth of topics and issues that students in the Geography and Planning Department partake in and issues researched by students in the department over the last year. “…I don’t know, I always thought Geography was just about labelling maps and stuff”, an first-year student said as she stared at the display.

Toni Papa, Cameron Morris, Nikki Ng

Toni Papa, Cameron Morris, Nikki Ng

Organized by the Toronto Undergraduate Geography Society, this event was the first of its kind for the department and promises to be a highlight of the TUGS event calendar in future years. A sentiment echoed by many, this Exhibit was a great opportunity for students to explore the field of Geography and its many subsets and applications. Absent from the exhibit were written papers and research reports, elements of academic life that students may be all-too familiar with. Students of all experience levels, including graduate students, interacted with one another and excitedly spoke of the upcoming freedom of summer months, the return of grad school applications, and pending field courses. The Toronto Undergraduate Geography Society’s exhibit continues to represent the University of Toronto’s geography student body, providing a valuable element to student life.

Phillip Bruno, Mian Mansoor Ahmad, Demos Antonopolous, Aliya Naqvi, Kathy Giesbretch

Phillip Bruno, Mian Mansoor Ahmad, Demos Antonopolous, Aliya Naqvi, Kathy Giesbretch